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of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are mong on to the world series. but just in this room, all of you are giants and making sure that san francisco is the world champion when it comes to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that create
to thank you for having us here. we will begin by expressing our appreciation to all of those who help us in our work on behalf of the over 15,000 english language learners in our district, and we did provide you with some written data which i will be loosely following in my beginning here. we're very grateful to our english language students and our representatives who continue to attend our bcc meetings and they voice their concerns to us and we're able to bring these issues forward, and to garner attention to them, and to make remedies. we're thankful for our translators who attend every meeting that we have, both spanish and can tonenies and some of the things that we were able to -- [inaudible] strict and with the help of our -- kristina wong and jennifer fong, the two people we work most closely with. we have a english learner program guide and we didn't have this before and it's also translated into english -- into spanish and conton easy and serves as a guide to our english learner family who is find coming to epc and to the district very intimidating and very confusing. we wor
in the head at this metro bus stop. the witness accounts and using this surveillance video, police andked down the suspect under second-degree murder charges. >> he was stabbed. he appeared drunk or high. we think that he saw that he and exhibitedred hate. >> they want the justice department to investigate and take over the case. intent is difficult to prove in any murder prosecution. >> there is an assistant to it a justice department policy advisor. she says defining a hate crime is not easy. it really depends on the jurisdiction. . >> there are many questions. i think all of the facts need and thet on the table decision reached as to why or this is or not a hate crime. that u.s. attorney office has declined to comment. prosecutors will have to prove killed jonesry specifically because he was transgendered. the government faces a first- charge. we are told a hate crime conviction would not add to jail time. satellitess -- and a center, richard reeve, abc 7 news. he claimed he was mistreated during his sentence for an assault. he was heldce says confinement and denied medical care. use signab
or for any athletic field, call 831-5510. you can write us at -- or walk in and say hello. and of course you can find more information moresfrecpark.org. --track. >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome laura republican powell jobs chair and co-founder of college track. >> thank you. good morning on behalf of the board, staff and students of college track it's my pleasure to welcome you to the bay center. it's an honor to have you here today and mayor lee welcome back. your support for the student is important. even though people talk about globaltion people are local and jobs are local. each of us each day can fix the neighborhood. real progress is credit place specific and - this concreteness is one of the benefits of college track. it lift up one student after another it looks after and supports individuals. it stands or falls on the local individual concrete attention. there is nothing global about it's on the difference even though we believe that other institutions like ours with help the world. slowly we partially we build out. we're great deal of that mayor lee
invasions or violent assault because they had a gun to protect themselves. most of us are glad it ended well for you. those are the two bookends. you mentioned, captain kelly, and i appreciate you being here, appreciate your comments about you and your wife being reasonable people. i do not doubt that one bit. the question is, am i an unreasonable american if i oppose this bill? am i an unreasonable american to believe the constitution says guns commonly used by the population for legitimate purposes? i do not want to own a gun to attack my government. that is not what i think a legitimate purpose is. let's talk about a real world incident that happened in loganville, georgia in january 2012. one bullet in the hands of a mentally ill person or a convicted felon is one too many. six bullets in the hands of a mother protecting her twin 9 year-olds may not be enough. so i have a chart here. at the top is the 38 revolver. on the right is a 9 millimeter pistol. that holds 15 rounds. does everyone on the panel agree that a convicted felon should not have either one of those guns? does everybody ag
know, try to achieve the greatest number of units because that makes the greatest sense for us in terms of the economy of scale in terms of the particular development and so our goal will be to try to achieve the limit that you are authorizing at 150 for the site. and on that particular site. and that will be part of the request for proposals. and the i think that the only question, is really the question of timing in terms of the pipeline and you know all of the competing needs from on the housing trust fund but they are clearly very interested in this neighborhood. we don't have affordable housing in this immediate neighborhood now. we think that affordable housing is a public benefit that should be shared with all neighborhoods of san francisco and so we look forward to developing it on the site. >> thank you for that comment, as far as the architecture goes, i think that the skillfulness on how both projects are presented to including the detail and does not really require anything in common, the one that i think that i hope and if you want to ask to please come to the podium, norma
that you would see either a police officer in the past would use or you will see even the criminals out there with revolvers still. all right? hundreds and hundreds of thousands of revolvers in the country and they are not illegal in california. let me go to the semiauto that the officers carry, neck, any questions on the revolver. >> for each bullet have you to pull the trigger. >> that is correct, each time that you have to turn it and it fire and turns. >> if it is a semi, or a revolver you have to press the trigger every time for each round to come out. >> in 1994, 18 years ago jim galf was killed at pioneer franklin and we all did not have the same guns at the time, some still had revolvers and others had purchased semiauto mat semi auto mat ticks and where the suspect had a german ak 47 and held off 120 police officers for a half hour firing 500 rounds before the swat took him out and prompted the department to go to a standardized weapon just so that we would have a chance. >> that is correct. >> this is a semiauto. also inoperatable. it is one that the police department carries,
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
. we will begin with john collins to give us a look at what is coming up. >> it seems like a light snow caused a lot of problems as far as traffic is concerned. people are taking it for granted. i will buy this over a foot of snow. a little clipper is coming in out of the ohio river valley. it moved out of that area this morning and into our area this afternoon. there is another one behind it in iowa. i want to give you a few totals that accumulate. 9/10 of an inch. let's see. 1 inch in garrison. at simpsonville -- only a trace in and around all county. -- in anne arundel county. generally speaking, less than an inch of snow. there are several more of these clippers out they're lined up and ready to come in. i will talk about that in the instaweather plus forecast. >> you can get the forecast as it is updated on our apps that give you radar and the seven-day forecast in the palm of your hand. now to new orleans, which has been inundated with ravens' fans. >> for those of us watching in baltimore, it seems like the big easy is covered in purple pride. our 11 news reporter knows for sure.
us. learn our secrets. >> announcer: "the american woodshop," with scott phillips is brought to you by... >> delta -- the heart of woodworking for over 85 years. porter-cable -- the soul of woodworking for over 100 years. >> woodcraft -- since 1928 providing traditional and modern woodworking tools and supplies to generations of craftsmen. woodcraft -- helping you make wood work. >> gorilla glue -- for the toughest jobs on planet earth. >> phillips: behind me, you can see i'm a creek without a paddle. look at these three walls right here. well, the space varies dramatically. and for this space to work, i need three mirrors to match the cabinets below that are walnut and have a classic, old look to it. come with me. i'll show you how to cut this egg-and-dart molding and create your own custom frame, whatever the size. let's head to the woodshop. any good frame on a mirror or a picture will have a mitered angle, and the way to cut it is with a miter saw. but first, before you start cutting, make sure that the fence is lined up all the way across. another thing is the table has to be f
are building them to last. siemens, answers. >> theu.s.economyinthefourthquarte of. the u.s. economy in the fourth quarter of last year october, november, december contracted by 0. 1%. one-tenth of 1%. it was the first contraction in three years and it rattles financial markets. much of the slippage in gross domestic product, was due to what the u.s. federal reserves describes as quote weather related disruptions and other transitory facts unquote. the central bank is keeping monetary policy on hold. and says n worth of long-term securities a month, until there is a substantial improvement in the outlook for the labor market. also, the cut back in department of defense outlays, is likely to fuel concerns about the size of a slow down and the full economic fallout of the large quote unquote sequester cuts scheduled for a month from now, the start of march. the president's press secretary said this about the sequester. quote, across-the-board cuts to education, to research and development, would have repeat, would have, damaging effects on our economy and our long-term economic prospec
world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org.
he saw and did. what he recommended was focused. means related to end us. 0-- ends. we are emerging from some of the longest wars in american history. victory never determined by when we could win, but when could we leave. extrication is not the metric that you want to evaluate the performance and behavior of the most consequential power on earth. barack obama is the great extricate her. his role is to get americans out of conflicts, not get them into new ones. cruel and unforgiving assessment. >> thank you, aaron. [applause]>> we will take it from your rebuttal. we will now have a three-minute rebuttal from liana. we will leave it to josh to do that rebuttal. >> i will say couple of things quickly. first, with all due respect to the presidency, it is not up to him or the president what history provides. history presents challenges, whether he wants to do the great indicator -- it is not up to him. history will operate the way it does. we will assess the various challenges on their own. secondly, i understand the problem of knowledge and ignorance and personal and political life and
of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to return to private corporate practice, one more government appointee spinning through the lucrative revolving door between washington and wall street. that door could be a big reason why government treats the banks with kid gloves. a man who once worked for citigroup, jack lew, the president's chief of staff, has been picked to be the new treasury secretary. and mary jo white, the newly named head of the securities and exchange commission, is a chief litigator at a top law firm representing big investment banks like morgan stanley. with all this happening, it's time to talk with journalist matt taibbi. you've seen him on our broadcast before. a contributing editor at "rolling stone," he's been tracking the high crimes and misdemeanors of wall street and washing
, a discussion about the use of enhanced interrogation techniques in the hunt for osama bin laden, after that, the moderator for the 2012 presidential and vice president of the eight talk about their roles in the impact of twitter and other social media. now, a former cia officials for the george w. bush administration defend the use of enhanced interrogations' in the search for osama bin laden. michael hitt and joins former cia counsel who provides the bush administration on interrogations'. . and jose rodriguez. the american enterprise institute hosts this 90 minute of that. >> good morning. welcome to this morning's panel. separating fact from fiction. i am a member of a task force on detention and interrogation policy. captain bigelow's recent film sparked controversy. recentryn bigelow's film sparked controvery. its graphic depiction of eight torture. for the most part, the outrage has come from the left. you are a conservative like me, when you see the washington left with the hollywood left, your temptation is to sit back and destroyed a fight. -- and enoy the fight. that is why many o
to go. we will start with 10 minutes from each team. leon will talk about why the u.s. should do more in the syria. that we will hear from josh and aaron on why the u.s. should not go any further. then the leon and bob will rebut their argument. i will begin a discussion by grilling the one or both of the teams on their arguments. the other side will have a chance to respond. each team will have three minutes to answer questions. their answers strike -- somebody could come and uniform and escort you out. let's get to it with bob k. again and leon on why the u.s. should be doing more in syria. >> thank you. thank you senator john mccain who is a national hero for the work he has been doing in the senate all of these years. i just use up some of my time, but it is worth it. let me stipulate first of all, the united states cannot do everything everywhere. we cannot involve ourselves even when there are humanitarian crises. we cannot always involve ourselves. there are limitations on our capabilities, our resources, and our attention. the question really is, does syria rise to the level t
, distinguished guests from the community, city family, all of us coming together. last year we held a pilot project on stockton street to help the merchants and support the merchants in selling their merchandise. we were able -- we were very successful. we got a lot of great feedback from the pilot. so this year again, we are doing the second year of the pilot. all the agencies and the community and the merchants, we got together, and talked about how we can do better. and without further delay, i will ask the mayor to come and say a few words, who is a big supporter of this project. mayor lee. >> thank you mohammed. [ applause ] >> i am very happy to be here. is this okay? all right. all right. [ laughter ] all right. first of all, happy new year to everyone. this is what i'm looking forward to every year and i know the merchants and residents and all the small businesses are excited. a year ago board of supervisors president david chiu and i and members of the community discussed how we can continue the economic vitality of the city and clearly we registered a big support for small
and separate fact from fiction. today, we have a distinguished panel to help us do that. three veterans. there were directly involved in the cia integration and detention program. also the hunt for osama bin laden. mike is the former director of the national security agency and the director of the intelligence agency. i got to know him back in 2006, when i was asked to write the president's speech revealing the existence of the interrogation program. he was very kind to give me access to all the intelligence and introduced me to the men and women who conducted the interrogation. but he is not only one of the smartest people i know. he is one of the most compelling witnesses. when he came into the office, the program had been suspended. he was not involved in its initial creation. he conducted a partial assessment. he gathered all the information and had to advise the president whether or not to restart it. he concluded he could not advise the president not to have an interrogation program. we will ask him to explain why that is. jose rodriguez is the former director of the cia service.
work done would you tell us a permit. >> good evening. this is my first time to remodel the house. i hired a contractor. and i followed his instructions and i didn't know he didn't get a permit. right now i already got the building permit and i'm looking for the electricity and the plumbing contractors so i can get those two permits to fix the property. so i hope you can reduce the penalty for me so i can have more resources to work on though fix this problem. thank you. >> excuse me. did you say you are looking for a replacement contractor? >> yes. >> how are you going to do whether or not the new contractor is able to file the appropriate permits? >> i already asked for recommendations and they are still looking for the proper ones. i haven't gotten one yet, but pretty soon i'm going to have one. >> okay. thank you. >> thanks >> mr. duffy? . good evening commissioners. congratulations on the new appointments. >> thank you. >> on this case we received a complaint that -- the department received a complaint on the 9th of october, 2012, remodeling done without permit. we
that contacted us. tom sullivan show, we are open for business 24/7. check out our facebook page. follow me on twitter and all the ways to contacted us are on the web page which is my name tom sullivan. thanks for joining us. make sure and tune into the radio show. we're on fox news talk, seer ios every weekday from putting to 6:00 p.m. we'll have another great show for you on fox business. in the meantime, i hope to hear you on the radio. lou: good evening, everybody. the dow jones industrials tonight above 14,000 for the first time since october of 2007. it just 155 points from its all-time high. the s&p regaining the 1500 level, the labor department today reporting 157,000 jobs were created last month, almost 170,000 people, however, dropped out of the workforce, despite all of that. the national unemployment rate rose one-tenth of a percentage. it now stands at 7.9. eight and a half million people have dropped out of the work force since president obama took office. the developments overseas tonight. a suicide bomber attack. the u.s. embassy in turkey. killing one, injuring three others
think use it will find the subject fascinating. [laughter] i'm going to talk about growing older in traditional societies. this subject is just one chapter of my "latest book which compares traditional small societies with our big bottom society with respect to many aspects of society, such as growing old, bringing up children, health, danger, a settlement disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book, my book of, i think, the most practical value to our daily lives, and, as a shameless author, i hope it is going to be my best-selling book. [laughter] it is about one i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies in new guinea of the last 60 years, and it is about what friends and others have learned from other trouble societies around the world. the essence of living in big, industrial societies and permanent housing with central governments to make decisions with writing and books and the internet. most people live past age 60, where we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you
begun control and meet specific neighborhood needs needs and we have residential use and on the ground floor and limits none residential use that we want to apply in this area and we have actually in our district alcohol restricted use district and it's actually expiring and we are going to incorporate new alcohol steenings of that to the future, commercial and the n m.d., and so other things that we are going to be applying as well to this legislation will be looking at how to prevent clustering of medical cannabis dispense res and upwe have go right now and one is in existence already and some are in the same black block of our district and to me while i'm supportive of medical cannabis dispense res i'm not sure it makes sen to have them clustering up within two store fronts of one another and so this will carry out in a discussion in the community about what is best in cannabis dispense re and is alcohol as well. >> thank you supervisor breed? and thank you and president chiu? >> first of all, i want to thank supervisor martha into the bike thetsz because like supervisor mar i
of a big differentiation factor in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to s
schwartz of u.s. "today." why silicon valley? why our part of town? >> i was actually very fortunate to have been given the opportunity by american experience. >> all right. why were they interested? they were -- the sloan foundation is one of their founders. they were really very, have interested in bringing the story "silicon valley" to the public. silicon valley, the revolution that hand here and created by these men, in terms of takingojs into the digital age, the information age really changed our lives in the way we interact today. people take for granted things like cell phones, computers and laptops. all of these thins sort of stand back to what these guys invented. >> even the corporate culture, right? i thought that was one of the interesting aspects, how they set the corporate culture at least here in silicon valley we take for granted today. >> certainly. the main character in this was instrumental, helping to bring the new idea to the democratic -- >> wearing junes. >> cubicals, everybody thinks with intel, you look at facebook, it's a very open environment where really
direction as what we should be attempting to accomplish. this should be an issue that does not divide us but brings us together. i hope that is the case in 2013. i very much appreciate the consumer electronics association hosting this tremendous trade show. i have been able to wander the floor this morning looking at the latest ideas and examples and innovation. it strikes me this is the area of the economy that has the grid -- greatest potential of growing and has the most to offer as far as job creation and it is the part of the country -- the economy that is least likely to be regulated by what happens in washington, d.c.. it is clear to me the evidence is that with less government intervention, the likelihood of innovation and economic success only increases. that is a concept that i think needs to garner greater support across the country. i got interested in to this issue of entrepreneurship as a frustrated member of the senate. only a short time into my time in washington as a senator, it became clear we were accomplishing so little. one of the motivating factors for my interest i
'll tell you why one presidential monument includes a statue of his dog. >> so join us now for this week's "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids ns." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm siena. we'll start with our top story. >> whether you've already got your driver's license, a learner's permit, or are still just a passenger, you're probably quite aware that the cost of gasoline has gone up a lot in recent years, and that's causing many people to rethink the cars they drive. carina reports on one answer to the high cost of gas -- electricity. >> the first cars appeared in the late 1700s. they were powered by steam, like locomotives. but soon, these horseless carriages moved to using what's called an internal combustion engine. basically, that means they ran by burning fossil fuel. and ever since, internal combustion engines have run on... >> gas. >> gas? >> gasoline? >> yes, gasoline. or its cousin, diesel fuel. but gas and diesel pollute. so carmakers tried electricity. that didn't work so well. one of the problems was the battery. they just couldn't make a battery powerful enough to make an
she is not otherwise occupied, like leading those in congress. nancy pelosi is used to speaking before representatives. she has been doing it for 25 years and she comes before us, representatives of all of san francisco and points beyond. she is used to celebrating occasions when those who have been excluded have been welcomed to something new and exciting. she has done it for women coming into the halls of congress. she has done it for seniors moving into housing. she has done it for those with hiv/aids gathering at the memorial grove. i could go on and on, but i would much rather hear her speak, so please welcome leadership nancy pelosi. [ applause ] >> thank you very much. thank you very much for your very generous introduction, barry and for your great leadership at the st. anthony foundation, for the invitation to be here today with such distinguished guests. how about tyrone? is he something? [ applause ] but it's an honor to be with you barry, with susan swift, with doug shu-maker and our distinguished mayor, mayor lee. last time i saw him he was on the platform while president
for bringing forth the commendation. might i request on behalf of the board if the authors allow us add our names to your resolution. thank you. oh yes commissioner wynns. >> thank you. sorry i can't be there tonight, but national school board association meeting in washington, but i wanted to jump up when you said everybody has been involved in peer resources because i am proud to have been an active supporter of peer resources for more than 20 years and i am just really thrilled that this happened and we have been able to recently really show our support for peer resources at a time of transition when it's needed. i am committed myself as others connected to the program to be a supporter of whatever needed. thank you. >> thank you. roll call please. >> thank you. ms. wong. >> yes. >> ms. fewer. >> yes. >> mr. haney. >> yes. >> ms. maufas. >> yes. >> ms. mendoza. >> aye. >> ms. murase. >> aye. >> president norton. yes. >> seven aye's. >> commissioners, if you will do the honors with the certificates. thank you. >> all right. the next item we have recognition of mentoring for succes
many good friends. let me start off by thinking everybody at del sol high school for hosting us. [applause] go dragons. let me especially thing your outstanding principal. [applause] there are all kinds of notable guests here but i just want to mention a few. first of all, our outstanding secretary of the department of homeland security, and janet napolitano. [applause] our wonderful secretary of the interior ken salazar. [applause] former secretary of labor, hilda solis. [applause] two of the outstanding members of the congressional delegation from nevada, steve and gina. [applause] your own mayor, carolyn goodman. [applause] we also have some mayors who flew in because they know how important issue we are to talk about today is. maria from arizona. qassim from atlanta, georgia. rick from phoenix, arizona. and ashley from fresno, calif. [applause] than all of you are here, as well as some of the top labor leaders in the country. we are so grateful. outstanding business leaders are here as well. of course, we have wonderful students here. [applause] those of you have a seat, fee
. but if an individual leaves, and on their own volition within the first year, they are going to come back and help us refill the position with just administrative costs. >> only if they are not san francisco-based? >> no. only if they are within, if they work for the city currently, and they decide to go to another job, within that first year, then they are they are not guaranteeing that they will come back for no cost. but they are guaranteeing that if they recommend a person outside of the city, comes in and leaves, then they will. now ted and i will work on negotiating a contract, you know, this is all negotiations. and if you desire a different kind of scenario, and we can talk to them about it. >> well, it seems that they are recommending somebody, does not matter where they are. personally. >> i actually have not had a conversation with them. so i don't know their logic in doing that in their need of something that is logical. >> okay. >> so, that is what ted as i said, ted is going to take the lead on this. and also will be working with president mccarthy. >> i think that it is okay because ul
're using economic tools to address strategic challenges, for example, in afghanistan, because along with the security transition and political transition, we are supporting an economic transition that boosts the private sector and increases regional economic integration. it's a vision of transit and trade connections we call the new silk road. a related lever of power is development and we are helping developing countries grow their economies not just through traditional assistance but also through greater trade and investment, partnerships with the private sector, better governance and more participation from women. we think this is an investment in our own economic future and i love saying this because people are always quite surprised to hear it, seven of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are in africa. other countries are doing everything they can to help their companies win contracts and invest in emerging markets. other countries still are engaged in a very clear and relentless economic diplomacy. we should, too, and increasingly, we are. and make no mistake, there
the territory. they know the people. they know who is who. they can pick out the rebels and deliver them to us. >> for months they've been training in this camp south of the front line. brooding over what happened last year. that's when rebels first twarring a separatist, but then jihaddies, some linked to al qaeda, came to their homes. they tied up the head of the family and then raped his wife in front of him. and then his daughter. i saw it with my own eyes. i thought my family would be next. so we fled. they raped many women. they took them into the dunes for two or three days and then they came back for more. >> we've heard rebels commit as many rapes. but the militias keen to stress to me there will be no justice. >> you cannot take justice into your own hands. >> this man says he also saw girls taken to be raped. and young men forced to join the rebels. he says now they want revenge. that's the word they're not meant to use. but they're the successors of the previous militia accused of atrocities, particularly against ethnic tuareg and they hope the military will arm them soon. these fo
help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should also hear them ask for our help, because i k
with us. >> we're back on "mosaic" talking about vatican ii and father dave pettinggil is there talking about a shot at vatican ii. there are a lot of folks there. >> that's why it's so extraordinary when we take a look at the picture. this is st. peter basilica. bishops are there. these men were ordained maybe 1920, '30 and '50. all of the theology was done in latin. it was quite definite and monolithic. these men come and they are open and they receive first of all an experience of church. these men pray together, celebrate the eucharist together and also they have these meetings at the two coffee bars, that they call bar jonas. they begin to see we're multicultural. gradually they learn from experts, they study theology. they took charge of the council and some of the document prepared by the vatican congregations were rejected because they were too legalistic and a whole new approach came thanks to what these men were experiencing as church people. they did an extraordinary job. >> i want to ask you too, vatican ii is a brand n
understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ [ dog barks ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] something powerful is coming. ♪ see it on february 3rd. ♪ >> super bowl weekend. you going to bet on the game? watch out your government may punish you, even your poker game may be illegal, but government likes to ban things like ticket scalping. >> we have to get the resellers out of the process. >> some people want to ban missioned martial arts. >> high school cheerleading is more dangerous than mmo . >> and how about that ban on drugs, with so much money in sports should college stars be paid? >> no. >> let's ask, what if government ran sports. >>. john: sunday you will make a bet on the super bowl but the trouble is it your a baltimore fan your team is expected to lose a had to make a bet that is fair? pilot get the point* spread which is about 2.5 points points, as san francisco could bid you could win your bet that makes it more in
screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state laws and it can feel daunting to think about getting involved in legislation at that level, although we try to make that easy for most to do by signing on to online actions and stuff, but for parents with kids, changing policies at schools can be an accessible thing, joining pta's or talking to the school board about having integrated pest management so kids aren't exposed to pesticides on playgrounds, that's been successful. there's a huge movement to get safer, healthier foods into schools and they just revised the school lunch guidelines, but also you could go organic, you could go local and there are sc
could be three-block faces as in this case. and it's used multiple times in the public works code. amid the block face where the star is. and all of these businesses did not receive notice. so dpw testified a couple of months ago that 101 2nd street is within a 300' radius. i want to ask dpw did anyone at 101 2nd street receive notice? if they did not, notice was not served properly. the second point is the 300' radius. the ordinance use the word "radius." the order itself says there are no like foods within a 300' radius. radius is the proper measurement and dpw is going to get up here and say oh, no, we're going use walking distance and we can't determine what a 300' radius, when they are required to send out a notice to businesses within a 300' radius. they know all the businesses within that 300' radius and they are going to get up here and say i don't know what businesses are within a 300' rayus? that is just crock. and third, the starbucks objection. starbucks objected and dpw says hey, if starbucks would have objected we would have denied the permit. i don't see how you got ar
. we had an eventful year and we have romo being romo behind us, but this has been truly amazing and without you guys we wouldn't be here and you guys are by far the best fans in baseball and we got to all right that all this season and it's unbelievable and this next guy needs no introduction but we will give him one anyway. mvp posey. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. audience: mvp! mvp! >> thank you for me look looking around and seeing all the excitement and happiness on everyone's face you realize an accomplishment like this means more than just winning a game. this is about making memories with your family and friends to last a lifetime and i think we all know and believe that if you think something's achievable as long as you're willing to work hard enough for it and believe it can happen you can get it done and i just want to thank you guys for all your energy and excitement you bring to san francisco and for the giants day in and day out. you all are the best. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> well, -- audience: romo, romo. >> well, first off congratulations sa
. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have
and a now, it starts and moves forward and cuts us off from any access to african history, which was not what woodson in tended. and so, we obviously owe the value of our higher to those people who suffered so much and those who are descended from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owed them something for that, but we owe them the story of themselves. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good, sound psychological health, on ashes and obliterated history. when i was a child in richmond, virginia, weiss to have this phrase that we used all the time. from here to timbuktu. but, nobody knew what timbucktoo was. nobody knew the meaning of the word. didn't know where it was and didn't even know it was a place. timbucktoo of course was a crossroads of commerce but it was also a site the site of one of the world's first universities of san kora which was built before the blackmore's ilk the first university in spain at sala make a and 7-eleven a.d.. and so still in timbuktu you have all of these manuscripts written between five a.d. and 15 a.d., lite
to us on the sidelines of the security council meeting in munich. he says he wants to keep in regular contact with syrian opposition. iran is another staunch ally of the syrian president. after the 45 minute meeting, they talked about a way to remove the regime with the least possible bloodshed. there has been serious opposition to the presence of government subject to the condition including 160,000 prisoners. we will go live from munich, lots to talk about already. we have the defense minister weighing in with his own views. what did he say? >> that is right, syria has remained high on the agenda here on sunday morning. the conference heard from another key regional player, he told the conference that in his view the fall of a sought -- assad was imminent and would deal a heavy blow to his allies in the region, would be made to pay a price. he was asked to comment on reports that israeli jets bombed targets inside syria over the last few days. there was no surprise that he did not leap to ended mission, but he did give what some called a tacit admission. >> i cannot admit anything.
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